Wubble world

Daniel Hewlett, Shane Hoversten, Wesley Kerr, Paul R Cohen, Yu Han Chang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We introduce Wubble World, a virtual environment for learning situated language. In Wubble World children create avatars, called "wubbles," which can interact with other children's avatars through free-form spontaneous play or structured language games. Wubbles can also learn language from direct interaction with children, since the system uses principles from developmental psychology to restrict the complexity of this learning task: A shared attention model that includes deictic pointing, and a concept acquisition system that allows for rapid learning of new words from a limited number of exposures. Since we have complete knowledge of the state and structure of the virtual environment, we are able to track correspondences between utterances and the scene in which they are uttered. This sentence/scene corpus will be a valuable resource as we attempt to tackle more sophisticated language learning tasks, such as the acquisition of syntax and verb semantics from world dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007
Pages20-24
Number of pages5
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007 - Stanford, CA, United States
Duration: Jun 6 2007Jun 8 2007

Other

Other3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007
CountryUnited States
CityStanford, CA
Period6/6/076/8/07

Fingerprint

Virtual reality
Semantics
Virtual Environments
Language
Avatar
Syntax
Utterance
Verb Semantics
Interaction
Concept Acquisition
Situated Learning
Language Acquisition
Developmental Psychology
Deictic
New Words
Resources
Language Games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Visual Arts and Performing Arts

Cite this

Hewlett, D., Hoversten, S., Kerr, W., Cohen, P. R., & Chang, Y. H. (2007). Wubble world. In Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007 (pp. 20-24)

Wubble world. / Hewlett, Daniel; Hoversten, Shane; Kerr, Wesley; Cohen, Paul R; Chang, Yu Han.

Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007. 2007. p. 20-24.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hewlett, D, Hoversten, S, Kerr, W, Cohen, PR & Chang, YH 2007, Wubble world. in Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007. pp. 20-24, 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007, Stanford, CA, United States, 6/6/07.
Hewlett D, Hoversten S, Kerr W, Cohen PR, Chang YH. Wubble world. In Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007. 2007. p. 20-24
Hewlett, Daniel ; Hoversten, Shane ; Kerr, Wesley ; Cohen, Paul R ; Chang, Yu Han. / Wubble world. Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007. 2007. pp. 20-24
@inproceedings{0b58310caf4b48ceb2541aad8280f672,
title = "Wubble world",
abstract = "We introduce Wubble World, a virtual environment for learning situated language. In Wubble World children create avatars, called {"}wubbles,{"} which can interact with other children's avatars through free-form spontaneous play or structured language games. Wubbles can also learn language from direct interaction with children, since the system uses principles from developmental psychology to restrict the complexity of this learning task: A shared attention model that includes deictic pointing, and a concept acquisition system that allows for rapid learning of new words from a limited number of exposures. Since we have complete knowledge of the state and structure of the virtual environment, we are able to track correspondences between utterances and the scene in which they are uttered. This sentence/scene corpus will be a valuable resource as we attempt to tackle more sophisticated language learning tasks, such as the acquisition of syntax and verb semantics from world dynamics.",
author = "Daniel Hewlett and Shane Hoversten and Wesley Kerr and Cohen, {Paul R} and Chang, {Yu Han}",
year = "2007",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781577353256",
pages = "20--24",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Wubble world

AU - Hewlett, Daniel

AU - Hoversten, Shane

AU - Kerr, Wesley

AU - Cohen, Paul R

AU - Chang, Yu Han

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - We introduce Wubble World, a virtual environment for learning situated language. In Wubble World children create avatars, called "wubbles," which can interact with other children's avatars through free-form spontaneous play or structured language games. Wubbles can also learn language from direct interaction with children, since the system uses principles from developmental psychology to restrict the complexity of this learning task: A shared attention model that includes deictic pointing, and a concept acquisition system that allows for rapid learning of new words from a limited number of exposures. Since we have complete knowledge of the state and structure of the virtual environment, we are able to track correspondences between utterances and the scene in which they are uttered. This sentence/scene corpus will be a valuable resource as we attempt to tackle more sophisticated language learning tasks, such as the acquisition of syntax and verb semantics from world dynamics.

AB - We introduce Wubble World, a virtual environment for learning situated language. In Wubble World children create avatars, called "wubbles," which can interact with other children's avatars through free-form spontaneous play or structured language games. Wubbles can also learn language from direct interaction with children, since the system uses principles from developmental psychology to restrict the complexity of this learning task: A shared attention model that includes deictic pointing, and a concept acquisition system that allows for rapid learning of new words from a limited number of exposures. Since we have complete knowledge of the state and structure of the virtual environment, we are able to track correspondences between utterances and the scene in which they are uttered. This sentence/scene corpus will be a valuable resource as we attempt to tackle more sophisticated language learning tasks, such as the acquisition of syntax and verb semantics from world dynamics.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84883086668&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84883086668&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781577353256

SP - 20

EP - 24

BT - Proceedings of the 3rd Artificial Intelligence and Interactive Digital Entertainment Conference, AIIDE 2007

ER -