X-kernel: An open operating system design

Norman C. Hutchinson, Larry Lee Peterson, Herman Rao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The authors propose an operating system design that views a workstation as a portal through which users access Internet resources. Such a system should accommodate a variety of protocol suites yet present users with an integrated and uniform interface to all the protocols and, as a consequence, to all Internet resources. Toward this end, they have designed an operating system, called the x-kernel, that consists of three major components: a configurable kernel that provides uniform access to a wide array of protocols, a heterogeneous file system, and a customizable user interface. The central element in this design is the protocol. The kernel implements a library of useful protocols. The file system and user interface, in turn, provide a per-user environment that translates a resource name into the protocol that should be used to access the resource. The authors describe the library of protocols, the file system, and the user interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProc Second Workshop Workstation Oper Sys WWOS II
Editors Anon
PublisherPubl by IEEE
Pages55-59
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)081862003X
StatePublished - 1989
EventProceedings of the Second Workshop on Workstation Operating Systems (WWOS-II) Workstation Operating Systems (WWOS-II) - Pacific Grove, CA, USA
Duration: Sep 27 1989Sep 29 1989

Other

OtherProceedings of the Second Workshop on Workstation Operating Systems (WWOS-II) Workstation Operating Systems (WWOS-II)
CityPacific Grove, CA, USA
Period9/27/899/29/89

Fingerprint

Systems analysis
Network protocols
User interfaces
Internet
Computer workstations
Computer operating systems
Interfaces (computer)
Computer systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Hutchinson, N. C., Peterson, L. L., & Rao, H. (1989). X-kernel: An open operating system design. In Anon (Ed.), Proc Second Workshop Workstation Oper Sys WWOS II (pp. 55-59). Publ by IEEE.

X-kernel : An open operating system design. / Hutchinson, Norman C.; Peterson, Larry Lee; Rao, Herman.

Proc Second Workshop Workstation Oper Sys WWOS II. ed. / Anon. Publ by IEEE, 1989. p. 55-59.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hutchinson, NC, Peterson, LL & Rao, H 1989, X-kernel: An open operating system design. in Anon (ed.), Proc Second Workshop Workstation Oper Sys WWOS II. Publ by IEEE, pp. 55-59, Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Workstation Operating Systems (WWOS-II) Workstation Operating Systems (WWOS-II), Pacific Grove, CA, USA, 9/27/89.
Hutchinson NC, Peterson LL, Rao H. X-kernel: An open operating system design. In Anon, editor, Proc Second Workshop Workstation Oper Sys WWOS II. Publ by IEEE. 1989. p. 55-59
Hutchinson, Norman C. ; Peterson, Larry Lee ; Rao, Herman. / X-kernel : An open operating system design. Proc Second Workshop Workstation Oper Sys WWOS II. editor / Anon. Publ by IEEE, 1989. pp. 55-59
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