Young adult and parent perceptions of facilitation: Associations with overparenting, family functioning, and student adjustment

Tricia J. Burke, Chris G Segrin, Kristen L. Farris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Overparenting occurs when parents engage in developmentally inappropriate involvement in their children’s lives. This topic is salient in the context of young adults attending college, as this developmental stage necessitates independent decision-making and adjustment on the part of these students. At the same time, the turbulence involved in this transition might engender parental interference and facilitation that could impact young adults’ adjustment and perceived family functioning. This study used structural equation modeling to examine overparenting, perceived interference, facilitation, student adjustment, and family functioning in 302 parent–young adult dyads. Results indicated that overparenting was associated with facilitation, but not interference. Whereas this association was negative for young adults, it was positive for parents. This pattern was also reflected in the indirect effects of overparenting on student adjustment through young adults’ versus parents’ perceived facilitation. Young adults appear to have better outcomes when they perceive their parents to be facilitating their goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Family Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 28 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication

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