"You're going to eat that?" Relationship processes and conflict among mixed-weight couples

Tricia J. Burke, Ashley K. Randall, Shannon A. Corkery, Valerie J. Young, Emily A Butler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines conflict among heterosexual mixed-weight (i.e., one overweight and one healthy weight partner) and matched-weight couples (N = 43 couples). Participant sex, eating together, partner health support, and negative partner influence were examined as moderators of the association between weight status and conflict. Using dyadic models, we found that mixed-weight couples, specifically couples including overweight women and healthy weight men, reported greater conflict both generally and on a daily basis, compared to matched-weight couples; however, general conflict was reduced with greater perceived support from the partner. Mixed-weight couples who reported eating together more frequently also reported greater general conflict. These findings suggest that mixed-weight couples may experience more conflict than matched-weight couples, but perceived support from the partner can buffer this conflict. This research suggests that interpersonal dynamics associated with mixed-weight status might be important for romantic partners' relational and personal health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1109-1130
Number of pages22
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume29
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Health
Weights and Measures
Moderators
eating behavior
moderator
Conflict (Psychology)
health
Eating
Heterosexuality
Buffers
experience
Research

Keywords

  • conflict
  • eating together
  • romantic relationships
  • support
  • weight status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

"You're going to eat that?" Relationship processes and conflict among mixed-weight couples. / Burke, Tricia J.; Randall, Ashley K.; Corkery, Shannon A.; Young, Valerie J.; Butler, Emily A.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 29, No. 8, 12.2012, p. 1109-1130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burke, Tricia J. ; Randall, Ashley K. ; Corkery, Shannon A. ; Young, Valerie J. ; Butler, Emily A. / "You're going to eat that?" Relationship processes and conflict among mixed-weight couples. In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 8. pp. 1109-1130.
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