Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres

Daniel Apai, T. Karalidi, M. S. Marley, H. Yang, D. Flateau, S. Metchev, N. B. Cowan, E. Buenzli, A. J. Burgasser, J. Radigan, E. Artigau, P. Lowrance

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brown dwarfs are massive analogs of extrasolar giant planets and may host types of atmospheric circulation not seen in the solar system. We analyzed a long-term Spitzer Space Telescope infrared monitoring campaign of brown dwarfs to constrain cloud cover variations over a total of 192 rotations. The infrared brightness evolution is dominated by beat patterns caused by planetary-scale wave pairs and by a small number of bright spots. The beating waves have similar amplitudes but slightly different apparent periods because of differing velocities or directions.The power spectrum of intermediate-temperature brown dwarfs resembles that of Neptune, indicating the presence of zonal temperature and wind speed variations. Our findings explain three previously puzzling behaviors seen in brown dwarf brightness variations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)683-687
Number of pages5
JournalScience
Volume357
Issue number6352
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2017

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Atmosphere
Telescopes
Planets
Temperature
Solar System
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  • Medicine(all)
  • General

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Apai, D., Karalidi, T., Marley, M. S., Yang, H., Flateau, D., Metchev, S., ... Lowrance, P. (2017). Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres. Science, 357(6352), 683-687. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aam9848

Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres. / Apai, Daniel; Karalidi, T.; Marley, M. S.; Yang, H.; Flateau, D.; Metchev, S.; Cowan, N. B.; Buenzli, E.; Burgasser, A. J.; Radigan, J.; Artigau, E.; Lowrance, P.

In: Science, Vol. 357, No. 6352, 18.08.2017, p. 683-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Apai, D, Karalidi, T, Marley, MS, Yang, H, Flateau, D, Metchev, S, Cowan, NB, Buenzli, E, Burgasser, AJ, Radigan, J, Artigau, E & Lowrance, P 2017, 'Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres', Science, vol. 357, no. 6352, pp. 683-687. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aam9848
Apai D, Karalidi T, Marley MS, Yang H, Flateau D, Metchev S et al. Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres. Science. 2017 Aug 18;357(6352):683-687. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aam9848
Apai, Daniel ; Karalidi, T. ; Marley, M. S. ; Yang, H. ; Flateau, D. ; Metchev, S. ; Cowan, N. B. ; Buenzli, E. ; Burgasser, A. J. ; Radigan, J. ; Artigau, E. ; Lowrance, P. / Zones, spots, and planetary-scale waves beating in brown dwarf atmospheres. In: Science. 2017 ; Vol. 357, No. 6352. pp. 683-687.
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